TESTIMONIALS FOR THE FAMOUS ARTHUR BROWN

An overflow crowd went crazy for the Crazy World of Arthur Brown, and rightly so.

Elmore Magazine re Le poisson Rouge Feb 2017

VERY first festival appearance of hologram WAS a wildly colorful Crazy World Of Arthur Brown celebrating the 50th anniversary of ‘Fire’. It’s fitting that Arthur is right at the forefront of this innovation considering his track record of industry firsts and breaking boundaries.

METAL TALK MAGAZINE

His operatic voice can do just about anything: he can go low, he can go falsetto, he can growl, he can bellow. Most times, he occupied the same soulful range as Tom Jones, though he took frequent detours into David Bowie and Tom Waits. That would be something amazing for a 50-year-old. For a gentleman Brown’s age, it was little short of miraculous.

LA Weekly 2017

Arthur Brown isn’t exactly a household name, but with his mind-bending 1968 debut, The Crazy World of Arthur Brown, the God of Hellfire and his cohorts singlehandedly injected performance art into rock ’n’ roll. Theatrical musicians that came after him—like Alice Cooper, KISS, and George Clinton—owe everything to Brown and his wild stage shows.

Portland Mercury

Perhaps only Frank Zappa had a similar influence on rock with a similar lack of commercial success—at least compared to his acolytes like Cooper, Kiss, the Who, Marilyn Manson, Ozzy Ozbourne and even George Clinton, to name a few.

Elmore magazine Poisson Rouge FebRUARY 2017

Long before there was Alice Cooper, Kiss or David Bowie (and certainly before Michael Jackson, though those were accidents) there was Arthur Brown. Covered in deathshead makeup, outlandish outfits and hair on fire, Arthur Brown pioneered theatrics in rock and roll, and coupled his Crazy (his term) act with operatic vocals mixed with banshee wails. Perhaps only Frank Zappa had a similar influence on rock with a similar lack of commercial success—at least compared to his acolytes like Cooper, Kiss, the Who, Marilyn Manson, Ozzy Ozbourne and even George Clinton, to name a few.
One of Brown’s regular trademarks back in the day was setting his head (or more) on fire—on purpose, but sometimes to excess. Today, fire has been replaced with LED lights, but that appears to be the only significant compromise the 75-year-old has made to his over-the-top performance. An overflow crowd went crazy for the Crazy World of Arthur Brown, and rightly so.

Elmore Magazine 2017

Almost 50 years ago, musical icon Arthur Brown stepped out on stage, five-foot tall flames leaping from his head, and uttered one of rock music’s most stirring lines: “I am the God of Hellfire.” At that point, the British theatrical rocker who brought us The Crazy World of Arthur Brown in ’68 had no way of knowing that he would come to be seen as a major pioneer in not only progressive rock and heavy metal, but the entire concept of what makes a stage show. He’s influenced generations of musicians who searched for an edge, from King Diamond, KISS, and Peter Gabriel to Marilyn Manson, Rob Halford, and Alice Cooper. Currently touring the U.K. in support of 2013’s Zim Zam Zim, Brown will celebrate his seventy-third birthday on June 24. His tour, and talks of funding for a documentary, strengthens the ever-dwindling hope that people will put age and influential writing before beauty and brand.

Godofelfia

Careening through a set that included old songs and new, Brown was every inch the showman, changing costumes as often as he could (his wardrobe included wizard’s robes, which he wore for a blistering cover of Screamin’ Jay Hawkins’ “I Put a Spell on You,” and a long coat made of electroluminescent wire); bumping and grinding with pinup model Masuimi Max, whom he could easily have grandfathered; and performing songs in virtually all the genres, from hard rock to Latin to psychedelia to blues.

LA WEEKLY FEBRUARY 2017

Then I thought I’d do an album around fire and the inner journey of a man who looks at the world and sees it’s going crazy so he decides he’s gonna look for the answers somewhere else, and he goes inside,” he continues. “And in order to break through society’s conditioning, he plunges into the fire. Since the process would include burning away the conditioning and thinking processes he’d been taught, I came up with the character the God of Hellfire. Then there was his opposite twin brother, the God of Pure Fire, which appeared in the album’s song ‘Come and Buy.'”

ARTHUR BROWN